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Tamra Mercieca: The Art of Self-Love

Laura Peppas

With her pin-up curls and gorgeous smile, Tamra Mercieca looks like a woman who has always been put together. What many people don’t know however, is that the former journalist once came close to ending it all.

“In my early 20s I was on the verge of being put in a mental home after several suicide attempts,” Tamra says.

“It was a horrible time, and it was something that had been there since my teens but my parents never really knew what it was.”

Diagnosed with severe clinical depression, Tamra sought help from doctors but says she wanted a better solution than to “take medical drugs for life.”

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Instead, she began looking into the art of self-love and its affect on the subconscious mind. She found addressing any deep insecurities and limiting beliefs slowly helped her overcome depression.

“I realised that working with the subconscious mind you can cure the depression so it cannot come back,” says Tamra.

“I started thinking, ‘if this is working for me, maybe it will work for others’.”

Using her experience as an accredited relationship and self-love therapist, Tamra launched her own company, Getting Naked, and founded Naked Therapy. The form of therapy teaches people to strip back mentally and tune into their subconscious in order to gain intelligence from a clear space that is free from “childhood programming”, which Tamra believes stops people moving forward in life.

“From the moment we are conceived we are like a sponge and absorb everything around us mainly from our parents or carers, and we take on beliefs about ourselves like ‘I’m not good enough, I’m not pretty enough, I’m not intelligent enough’,” says Tamra.

“This starts to create a negative mind chatter and sabotages us, stopping us from doing things we want to do. What I do is teach people to love ourselves again. Self-love – while it sounds so simple – remains elusive for most people, because from a young age we are taught to disconnect from this part of ourselves. It’s important to teach people how to work through those ups and downs of life instead of them having to rely on a therapist long-term.”

In October Tamra will share her insights at a two-day Mind Body Business event in Canberra alongside an impressive line-up of speakers, all aiming to help people in business challenge belief systems, test limits and break obstructive habits.

“Being in business is going to bring up all your insecurities, it’s very full on,” says Tamra.

“You have to have money to survive in the world we live in, and money is one of the biggest causes of stress for people. If you can get rid of the belief that is stopping you then business can be a lot of fun, but you do need to have that self-confidence.”

the essentials

What: Mind Body Business
When: Please note the date has changed for this event – a new date and venue are to be confirmed soon 
Web: www.mbbevent.com.au

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Laura Peppas

Laura Peppas is HerCanberra's senior journalist and communications manager and is the Editor of Unveiled, HerCanberra's wedding magazine. She is enjoying uncovering all that Canberra has to offer, meeting some intriguing locals and working with a pretty awesome bunch of women. Laura has lived in Canberra for most of her life and when she's not writing fervently she enjoys pursuing her passion for travel, reading, online shopping and chai tea. More about the Author

  • Jaimie

    I’m concerned by this article. I think it’s wonderful that Tamara has over come her mental illness, however, I’m worried that this article simplifies what is often a very complex problem. What is a “mental home”? Who is telling people that they will be depressed for the rest of their lives? Clinical depression should be treated by professionals with evidence based therapies. And by evidence based I mean well controlled RCT’s. Telling people that it is treatable within 10 sessions may lead to increased feelings of hopelessness in the future when symptoms of depression return, or if the desired results aren’t reached. A well intentioned article, and lovely story, but a concerning message.

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