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This Week in The Can

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From live music and theatre to exhibitions and festivals, here’s what’s happening this week in Canberra.

WHAT NOT TO MISS

Reconciliation Day

Reconciliation Day in Canberra will be held on Monday 31 May 2021 at the National Arboretum Canberra—a time for all Canberrans to learn about our shared histories, cultures, and achievements, and to explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia.

From basket weaving and yarning circles to live entertainment and a free BBQ, there is a whole host of things to look forward to with a range of free and family-friendly activities on offer throughout the day.

Get involved from 10 am to 2 pm at the National Arboretum Canberra. Find out more at events.canberra.com.au.

Making: A Way of Life

Presenting new collaborative work, metalsmiths Alison Jackson and Dan Lorrimer showcase the development, progression and creativity involved in producing small-batch edition tableware objects.

Blending small-scale production techniques with one-of-a-kind artwork processes, Alison and Dan will explore the skill of the craftsman along with another, perhaps rarer skill, the art of production. That is, the ability to develop, design, make and bring to fruition a collection that is repeatable and more widely accessible to audiences yet retains the character and an element of uniqueness, a hint of the maker’s hand, that a unique artwork would hold and is often lacking in massed produced products.

Taking this approach with their making has allowed Dan and Alison to create a financially sustainable career within the industry over the last twelve years.

Showing at Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre until 17 July.

Taste Local Festival at Canberra Centre

The Taste Local festival wraps up its month-long celebration of local producers and talents at Canberra Centre this weekend.

Don’t miss the last Friday pop-up bar—pop along between 5-8 pm for a complimentary drink and nibbles in Canberra Centre’s cosy set-up before finishing your late-night shopping in the centre. Sip on a local wine or a freshly made cocktail and relax in their exclusive pop-up bar while enjoying live music from local artists.

Visit canberracentre.com.au for more information.

Celebration! 10 years of Live at the Polo

Live at the Polo celebrates 10 years with a huge line-up of more than 15 acts across three stages!

Based at the Polish Club in Turner, catch some of Canberra’s best acts while celebrating the intangible good that live music brings to our cultural life.

Get set for Kilroy, Endrey, Kim Yang, Evan Buckley, Signs and Symbols, Bec Taylor and the Lyrebirds, Lucy Ridge and the Derby Widows, Nick Delatovic & The Empty Lake Singers, Rafe Morris, Magic Rob Universe, Slagatha Christie, Julia Johnson, Moondog, Betty Alto, Slow Dial and Chins.

Kicks off at 1.30 pm this Saturday, 29 May and runs until late at the Polish Club, Turner. Book your tickets at trybooking.com.

Rope

A brilliantly tense play from the author of Gaslight, which was performed by REP in 2016. Believing themselves to be intellectually superior to their contemporaries, two flatmates murder their friend purely to see if they can get away with it. They then throw a cocktail party, serving food from the top of the trunk where they have hidden his body. Tension and suspicions increase as the evening wears on.

Showing until  5 June at Canberra REP Theatre. More information and tickets from canberrarep.org.au.

Vertikal Snow Dance Party

Welcome winter and kickstart the 2021 snow season with a Snow Dance Party at Vertikal Snow Sports this Saturday 29 May! With live music, competitions and on-ski demonstrations throughout the evening, this event promises to be a night to remember.

Dress to impress in your best retro snow gear for a chance to win some very epic prizes. Prizes include Thredbo Lift Passes, BentSpoke beer, 2117 snow gear, Straightline snow accessories and Wildbrumby schnapps. Entry includes pizza, and kids entry is free.

More information and tickets from vertikalsnowsports.com.

Love Local Markets

Get along to The Plot in Pialligo this Sunday 30 May for the Love Local Markets.

Spend the day perusing fresh food, drink and lifestyle stalls from various regional businesses while enjoying the relaxed vibe and knowing that every time you open your wallet, you’re supporting a family trade, local business owners and regional communities.

You’ll also have the chance to check out the Pialligo Market Grocer, the Farm Shop Café, as well as interior designer and homewares shops, Wren & Rabbit Interiors and Pink Flamingo Interiors, Bison & Crusoe & Co.

On from 9 am to 12 noon at 12 Beltana Road, Pialligo. Find out more at theplotatpialligo.com.au.

FOOD & DRINK

 

The Pop Inn

The Pop Inn is at Bowen Park this weekend—pull up a table for two and enjoy a glass of wine and a charcuterie platter.

Popping up from 1 pm to 6 pm Saturday 29 and Sunday 30 May.

Find out more at thepopinn.com.

Whisky Wanderers

Think you know whisky? Think again as you learn, taste, judge and compare different techniques, styles, flavours and mixes guided by expert Phillip Jones as you embark upon whisky tales strange and true.

Complement your Whisky Wanderings with Pialligo Estate’s charcuterie boards, snacks and unlimited water in their custom-built tasting venue—Pialligo Fields.

Happening this Friday 28 May at Pialligo Estate, 18 Kallaroo Road, Pialligo.

Bookings are essential. See thepialligoestate.com.au for more information.

Haig Park Village Markets

The Haig Park Village Markets are about creating a vibrant farmers market filled with fresh, nutritious, quality produce and products at reasonable prices, with the added bonus of supporting and promoting our regional farmers and businesses.

Rosie and Alex are born and raised Canberrans who love all things markets. Their markets will be an evolving collaboration of many farmers, bakers, artisans and talented people, seeking to share their crafted specialties. They want to support local creative talent and nurture local businesses.

Working together with regional growers and local business they can create a lively and community-driven market that seeks to become a destination for locals and visitors alike.

Happening Sundays from 8 am at Haig Park, Braddon.

See Facebook for more information.

Taste Local Festival at Canberra Centre

The Taste Local festival wraps up its month-long celebration of local producers and talents at Canberra Centre this weekend.

Don’t miss the last Friday pop-up bar—pop along between 5-8 pm for a complimentary drink and nibbles in Canberra Centre’s cosy set-up before finishing your late-night shopping in the centre. Sip on a local wine or a freshly made cocktail and relax in their exclusive pop-up bar while enjoying live music from local artists.

Visit canberracentre.com.au for more information.

MUSIC, STAGE AND SCREEN

Celebration! 10 years of Live at the Polo

Live at the Polo celebrates 10 years with a huge line-up of more than 15 acts across three stages!

Based at the Polish Club in Turner, catch some of Canberra’s best acts while celebrating the intangible good that live music brings to our cultural life.

Get set for Kilroy, Endrey, Kim Yang, Evan Buckley, Signs and Symbols, Bec Taylor and the Lyrebirds, Lucy Ridge and the Derby Widows, Nick Delatovic & The Empty Lake Singers, Rafe Morris, Magic Rob Universe, Slagatha Christie, Julia Johnson, Moondog, Betty Alto, Slow Dial and Chins.

Kicks off at 1.30 pm this Saturday, 29 May and runs until late at the Polish Club, Turner. Book your tickets at trybooking.com.

Augie March: Sunset Studies Live 2021

Released in October 2000,  ‘Sunset Studies’ was the first long-player from Augie March. In 2021 Augie March is dusting off this classic album and performing it live.

Against prevailing trends, the album (at 74 minutes long) covered ground more likely to be trod by poets, psychoanalysts, historians and cultural theorists than by an eager young bunch of suburban kitchenhands hailing from Shepparton and Coburg.

The album went gold, it remains a favourite of an unusually diverse population across the planet, and is regularly named by prominent artists today as enormously influential.

Playing this Friday 28 May at Canberra Theatre. Tickets from canberraticketing.com.au.

HELLO?  IS THERE ANY BODY THERE?

As it turns out there are bodies EVERYWHERE in this comedy/farce by English writer Ian Hornby.

Breaking every rule of theatre, the actors engage with anyone and everyone including the stagehands, the technical crew AND the audience.  The result is a hilarious romp that refuses to take anyone or anything seriously.

Opens at Belconnen Community Theatre, Swanson Street, Belconnen this Friday 28 May and runs until Saturday 5 June. Get your tickets from canberraticketing.com.au.

Rope

A brilliantly tense play from the author of Gaslight, which was performed by REP in 2016. Believing themselves to be intellectually superior to their contemporaries, two flatmates murder their friend purely to see if they can get away with it. They then throw a cocktail party, serving food from the top of the trunk where they have hidden his body. Tension and suspicions increase as the evening wears on.

Showing until  5 June at Canberra REP Theatre. More information and tickets from canberrarep.org.au.

Lunchbox Acoustic

City Renewal Authority’s new Lunchbox Acoustic program of​ live performances in the city centre features talented, local artists performing weekdays at lunchtime (12 pm – 1:30 pm)

These live performances will bring life to the heart of the city and encourage people to spend time in our city centre’s outdoor public spaces.

The Lunchbox Acoustic program is a diverse mix of performances by entertainers from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, female and non-binary performers, singers and musicians and theatre, poetry and dance artists.

Happening until end of June. Visit act.gov.au to find out who’s performing this week!

Paradiso Reggae night

You may not be able to venture overseas at the moment but you can still get your weekly fix of culture and that holiday feels at Highball Express‘ Paradiso Reggae night.

Every Wednesday night you can catch a regular rotating local line-up—with each band bringing their unique flavour each week, expect a funky mix of tropical Ska, Dub, Reggae, Roots and Latin sounds. Doors open at 4 pm with live music starting at 8 pm.

Book online for the best seats, although walk-ins are welcome.

Live Music at Blackbird

Every Friday night a different artist plays at city bar Blackbird. Drop in for cocktails in a great cosy and candlelit atmosphere and enjoy amazing talent on stage every Tuesday and Friday night.

Check who’s playing and book your table at blackbirdbar.com.au.

Teddy Tahu Rhodes and Guy Noble

Acclaimed baritone Teddy Tahu Rhodes joins popular pianist and conductor Guy Noble for a concert of favourite arias and songs. This dynamic pair are back together to perform powerful and rapturous songs and delicate classical arias in a celebratory concert with a sprinkle of their beloved comedic flair.

Performing at The Playhouse on Saturday 29 May. Tickets from canberraticketing.com.au.

FESTIVALS + MORE

Taste Local Festival at Canberra Centre. Photography: Ben Calvert

Taste Local Festival at Canberra Centre

The Taste Local festival wraps up its month-long celebration of local producers and talents at Canberra Centre this weekend.

Don’t miss the last Friday pop-up bar—pop along between 5-8 pm for a complimentary drink and nibbles in Canberra Centre’s cosy set-up before finishing your late-night shopping in the centre. Sip on a local wine or a freshly made cocktail and relax in their exclusive pop-up bar while enjoying live music from local artists.

Visit canberracentre.com.au for more information.

Vertikal Snow Dance Party

Welcome winter and kickstart the 2021 snow season with a Snow Dance Party at Vertikal Snow Sports this Saturday 29 May! With live music, competitions and on-ski demonstrations throughout the evening, this event promises to be a night to remember.

Dress to impress in your best retro snow gear for a chance to win some very epic prizes. Prizes include Thredbo Lift Passes, BentSpoke beer, 2117 snow gear, Straightline snow accessories and Wildbrumby schnapps. Entry includes pizza, and kids entry is free.

More information and tickets from vertikalsnowsports.com.

Reconciliation Day

Reconciliation Day in Canberra will be held on Monday 31 May 2021 at the National Arboretum Canberra—a time for all Canberrans to learn about our shared histories, cultures, and achievements, and to explore how each of us can contribute to achieving reconciliation in Australia.

From basket weaving and yarning circles to live entertainment and a free BBQ, there is a whole host of things to look forward to with a range of free and family-friendly activities on offer throughout the day.

Get involved from 10 am to 2 pm at the National Arboretum Canberra. Find out more at events.canberra.com.au.

WORKSHOPS, TALKS + TOURS

Make Your Own at Canberra Glassworks

Create your own artwork with one-on-one guidance from a highly skilled Teaching Artist at the Canberra Glassworks.

Make your own paperweight, bird, tumbler or vase in a short one-on-one session from 20 to 40 minutes long—Saturday or Sunday sessions available

They also offer a variety of Creative Workshops, including glass blowing, flameworking, cold working, engraving, bead making, kiln forming and casting for all different levels of ability. Click here for details.

Book online at canberraglassworks.com.

Magic of Marion: 150 Years of Marion Mahony Griffin

Happy Birthday Marion Mahony Griffin

Join the National Capital Authority and other National Cultural Partners as they celebrate a year of Marion Mahony Griffin in the national capital.  This year marks Marion’s 150th Birthday, a woman that played such in integral part in architectural designs across two continents.

Marion is known to have produced some of the finest architectural drawings in Australia and America but was also instrumental in the award-winning design plans with her husband Walter for the design of Australia’s Capital, Canberra.

From walks to lectures, launches to talks, see the full program at nca.gov.au/marion.

Various events happening until 10 August 2021.

See nca.gov.au/marion for more information.

The 5.30 Club Canberra

Inspired by The 5:30 am Club in Sydney, Emily Davidson has started her own for us here in Canberra. Join her for your Power Hour on Mondays, Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 6 am-7 am at Eighty/Twenty Food in Braddon Canberra

Everyone is welcome and there is no cost involved. If you want to start your morning off on the right foot, come and join The 5.30 am Club Canberra! Bring along a book, your laptop or pen and paper—anything to work on for your Power Hour!

What could you do with an hour to yourself in your day? Start writing a book, smash your email inbox, journal, brainstorm ideas for your next project or plan your day…the sky is the limit! All while soaking up the sunrise over a morning brew, and all before peak hour.

Join The 5.30 am Club! Look for the blonde-haired girl with the llama on her table.

See sites.google.com/view/the530club for more information.

MARKETS

Love Local Markets

Get along to The Plot in Pialligo this Sunday 30 May for the Love Local Markets.

Spend the day perusing fresh food, drink and lifestyle stalls from various regional businesses while enjoying the relaxed vibe and knowing that every time you open your wallet, you’re supporting a family trade, local business owners and regional communities.

You’ll also have the chance to check out the Pialligo Market Grocer, the Farm Shop Café, as well as interior designer and homewares shops, Wren & Rabbit Interiors and Pink Flamingo Interiors, Bison & Crusoe & Co.

On from 9 am to 12 noon at 12 Beltana Road, Pialligo. Find out more at theplotatpialligo.com.au.

Haig Park Village Markets

The Haig Park Village Markets are about creating a vibrant farmers market filled with fresh, nutritious, quality produce and products at reasonable prices, with the added bonus of supporting and promoting our regional farmers and businesses.

Rosie and Alex are born and raised Canberrans who love all things markets. Their markets will be an evolving collaboration of many farmers, bakers, artisans and talented people, seeking to share their crafted specialties. They want to support local creative talent and nurture local businesses.

Working together with regional growers and local business they can create a lively and community-driven market that seeks to become a destination for locals and visitors alike.

Happening Sundays from 8 am at Haig Park, Braddon. Visit haigparkvillagemarkets.com.au for the latest.

Capital Region Farmers Market

Sample the region’s freshest produce at the Capital region farmers market—more than 100 stallholders bring their freshly picked, grown and handcrafted produce to the Market each week.

Speak to a stallholder and ask them where their produce comes from—you’ll be surprised what you’ll learn and pick up cooking, storage and usage tips. Find your favourite stallholder in the directory.

Happening every Saturday from 7 am– 11.30 am at Exhibition Park in Canberra.

See capitalregionfarmersmarket.com.au for more information.

Southside Farmers Market

Southside Farmers Market is a village market that provides all the fresh food you need for your weekly shop—and you can shake the hand of the grower.

Here you will find farm fresh fruit and vegetables, meat, fish, bread, eggs, honey and much more. A wide range of organic produce is available.

Held from 8.30am to 11am every Sunday at Canberra College, Launceston Street, Phillip. Find out more on Facebook.

EXHIBITIONS

Cameron Haas
Untitled 45. 2021
Acrylic on primed linen
132 x 107 cm

CAMERON HAAS | A M P L I F Y

A M P L I F Y is an exhibition of recent work by Cameron Haas, whose outstanding talent as an abstract artist has now been recognised internationally.

Amplify is an extension of a more organic motif that he has been exploring for the last few exhibitions. This group of paintings extends the format to allow more opportunity for colour interactions within the composition. He achieves this by using mid-ground forms and colours that act as a type of ‘halo’ around the foreground formations, adding another level or amplification to the composition.

Amplify is on show until 20 June at The Nancy Sever Gallery.

The Neck

The neck, often seen as a sensual part of the body, a site of vulnerability, is also a site of strength, supporting the heavy head, a conduit to our heart and lungs, providing life-giving oxygen to our bodies, and nourishment through the ingestion of food.

At a time when our planet and humanity seems to be suffocating on many fronts, strangled by powerful, self-serving ‘leaders’, Bridget Kennedy invites selected artists to explore the neck as a vehicle for political, social, and environmental critique.

Showing at Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre until 17 July.

The Impulse of Hysteria

Sometimes vulnerable and often intimate, The Impulse of Hysteria confronts the messy aspects of being human on blunt and uneasy terms. In a collection of 30 paintings, Ashley Cullen’s first solo exhibition imagines a visceral world of faces and bodies.

Inspired by mythic figures, tragedy and personal relationships, Cullen’s paintings deal explicitly with themes of love and loss as well as the fleeting yet intense emotions that characterise us as uniquely human.

Showing at Belconnen Arts Centre until 27 June | belcoarts.com.au

HiveMind: Honeybees, Democracy & Me

Bees are celebrated the world over as pollinators, champions of biodiversity, and for turning highly prized nectar into glorious golden honey. But a little-known fact about the humble honeybee is that they model a type of ideal democratic practice when it comes to making collective decisions, and in this way they model a crucial part of what makes a fully flourishing democracy.

Contrary to established assumptions, honeybee hives aren’t run according to top-down authoritarian rules led by a queen bee. The critical decisions which a beehive faces are made collectively for the good of the hive and the colony.

This new exhibition uncovers the stories of beekeeping at Australia’s Parliament Houses, both old and new, and shares what we could learn from bees on collective decision making for democracy.

Historical objects and personal anecdotes tell the story of how Australia became one of the first countries worldwide to allow beekeeping on its Parliament House grounds after William Yates MP sought permission under the ruse of an April Fool’s joke in the 1970s.

HiveMind also features a large-scale collaborative public art piece completed by members of the public at Old Parliament House during the Enlighten Festival in 2020. It features life advice and lessons arranged in a larger-than-life honeycomb inside the exhibition.

Showing at MOADOPH—find out more at moadoph.gov.au.

EASS 2021 | Group Exhibition @ GOST

Gallery of Small Things (GOST) is hosting its Third Emerging Artist Support Scheme (EASS) show. They have awarded five graduates from the Australian National University Art and Design School to show new artworks in this tiny gallery.

The artists have graduated in design, painting, print media and textiles. They have created between three to five artworks each which are available to purchase.

Showing until 3 June at GOST—visit galleryofsmallthings.com for more.

Making: A Way of Life

Presenting new collaborative work, metalsmiths Alison Jackson and Dan Lorrimer showcase the development, progression and creativity involved in producing small-batch edition tableware objects.

Blending small-scale production techniques with one-of-a-kind artwork processes, Alison and Dan will explore the skill of the craftsman along with another, perhaps rarer skill, the art of production. That is, the ability to develop, design, make and bring to fruition a collection that is repeatable and more widely accessible to audiences yet retains the character and an element of uniqueness, a hint of the maker’s hand, that a unique artwork would hold and is often lacking in massed produced products.

Taking this approach with their making has allowed Dan and Alison to create a financially sustainable career within the industry over the last twelve years.

Showing at Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre until 17 July.

Small Connections

Featuring JamFactory Metal Studio staff, tenants and associates, Small Connections is centered around the concept of connectivity and communication that jewellery offers the giver, receiver and wearer. The relationship people have with jewellery they collect and wear is unlike any other form of art as it can be carried as a token wherever the possessor wishes. Signifying love, faith, status and connection, jewellery is significant in how it as an object links people to each other.

Showing at Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre until 17 July.

Double Crossed

Double Crossed, eX de Medici’s extraordinary work, gravitates around concepts of power through violence, geo-economic politics and environment. Created in her Canberra studio over lockdown, this exhibition presents eX’s newest series of detailed watercolours of hybridised moths and weaponry.

The juxtaposition of weapons with these images of natural beauty continues eX’s study into the divide between two sciences; one devoted to the preservation of life on our planet and the other bent towards the destruction of the world through the advancement of human industry and greed.

Mesmerisingly beautiful, eX’s moths are deceptively complex, beguiling us with questions about violence, corruption and human ego.

Showing at Beaver Galleries until 30 May | beavergalleries.com.au

Belonging: Stories of Australian Art

This major collection presentation recasts the story of nineteenth-century Australian art. Informed by the many voices of Indigenous and non-Indigenous cultures and communities, the display reconsiders Australia’s history of colonisation. It draws together historical and contemporary work created by more than 170 artists from across Australia.

Belonging: Stories of Australian Art reveals different stories and connections between art, people and Country in its presentation of visual art and culture in Australia before 1900. The display highlights the endurance and resilience of Indigenous cultures and custodianship, as well as the impact and ongoing effects of colonisation. By highlighting how contemporary artists are engaged with the story of colonisation, Belonging shows the extent to which art and history are always being reinterpreted.

Showing now at nga.gov.au.

FIORI, NUDI E ACQUA

Internationally acclaimed fine art and fashion photographer, Canberra’s Lori Cicchini presents Fiori, Nudi e Acqua, a collection of works embellishing the beauty of florals, nudes and water.

Cicchini’s solo show is the largest body of work she has produced for one show. Her ethereal works, from nudes literally floating in water or nestled in nature to floral vanitas still lifes, celebrate the fleeting fragility of beauty. They reflect birth, death and rebirth, asher bodies shed their skin to metamorphosise like chrysalis.

Showing at Grainger Gallery until 6 June | graingergallery.com.au.

Mervyn Bishop: The Exhibition

Mervyn Bishop: The Exhibition features iconic photographs that derive from his career as a photojournalist, alongside personal images of family and friends and intimate portraits of members of the Aboriginal community.

Mervyn Bishop’s images of culture, politics and people have significantly influenced the collective understanding of Australia’s history. Spanning the past 60 years, the exhibition provides a fascinating insight into Bishop’s life and work.

Showing at National Film and Sound Archive of Australia until 1 August. Find out more at nfsa.gov.au.

Australien

Living in Australia as a child of parents who were born overseas can often be a delicate balance. Different lunches packed for school, different languages at home, different religions, different clothes, different skin.

Featuring first- and second-generation Australian artists— Lara Chamas, Mariana del Castillo, Caroline Garcia, Shivanjani Lal, Sancintya Mohini Simpson, Andy Mullens and Elefteria Vlavianos— Australien investigates the complexities of balancing the cultures of their heritage with the culture they live in today.

Showing at Canberra Contemporary Art Space until 11 July—visit ccas.com.au to learn more.

Body Layer; Semblance and Self

This exhibition presents the works of 11 significant Australian and International artists who have ‘unpacked’ the semblance of self through jewellery, as a highly focused activity of visualising, materialising and articulating possibilities of self-knowing. Communicating extremely diverse liminal qualities, traits, or viewpoints of what it is to be a living social human. Once willfully applied/connected to the relationally active body of a wearer, the nuanced signifiers within these works activate a communication of self, on self. This highly specific action is at the fundamental core of, what is jewellery.

These artists push beyond the familiar constraints of conventional physical jewellery formats. And, toward outcomes more precisely aligned with the specific communicative possibilities of jewellery. Through their expanded propositions each of these artist’s works also hints at what may be missing from the dominant globalised preconception of ‘jewellery’ as merely a trend based decorative object, i.e., that conveying one’s true self through jewellery can be a means of heightening compassionate understandings of each other. Moreover, that the action of socially acknowledging the breadth and diversity of human identity can enable a more equitable and cohesive society.

Showing at Craft ACT: Craft and Design Centre until 17 July.

Australian Love Stories

Reconnect and reflect with our new major exhibition, Australian Love Stories (in real life!) as we explore love, affection and connection in all its guises. From the enduring to the forbidden, romantic to platonic, the unrequited, obsessive, scandalous or creative. Swoon over more than 200 artworks from across photography, painting, works on paper, small sculpture AND an immersive glass installation.

Think Bob and Blanche, Kath and Kim, Jimmy and Jane Barnes, Nick and Susie Cave, Nell and Kylie Kwong. Think iconic artists like John Brack, Vincent Namatjira, Del Kathryn Barton, Davida Allen, Charles Blackman and more! See old favourites alongside loans from private and public collections and new works commissioned exclusively for the exhibition.

Showing at the National Portrait Gallery until 1 August. Find out more at portrait.gov.au.

Behind the Lines: The year in political cartoons

2020’s disruption and turmoil got more close and personal than most of us ever imagined. With most of us still wondering ‘what the pup’ just happened, the brand-new iteration of Behind the Lines: The year in political cartoons will help us make sense of the dog’s breakfast that was 2020.

Behind the Lines 2020 presents the best political cartoons from this dog of a year, including digital cartoons for the first time.

Showing at MOADOPH—find out more at moadoph.gov.au.

Talking With Trees

Artist Tracey Benson seeks to evoke the emotions of reverence, hope and empowerment through the use of photography, video and augmented reality.

As part of Canberra Tree Week, the exhibition features historic and contemporary images showing how the Australian National Botanic Gardens (ANBG) has evolved into a site of understanding of our native flora, as well as a place of reflection, discovery and species protection.

Showing at ANBG Visitor’s Centre until 30 May. Find out more at parksaustralia.gov.au.

Sammy Hawker Solo Exhibition

Sammy Hawker is an ACT-based visual artist. Her practice examines the methods and protocols of human and more-than-human collaboration when producing works that investigate sites of the Anthropocene.

She is interested in de-centering her position as the artist and breaking open the permanency of the photograph by inviting agents of the site to co-create the work. Through facilitating interaction with more-than-human entities this practice aims to draw attention to and make visible the hidden temporal realities & cross-species entanglements of the site.

Sammy’s practice is grounded in collaborative engagement. When investigating a site she will work closely with Traditional Custodians, scientists, ecologists and regenerative agriculturalists. These engagements assist her in interpreting quantitative and qualitative data as well as developing ecological literacy and a cultural understanding of the site. Cross-disciplinary partnerships illustrate a responsible way of moving forward in an age of environmental crisis.

Showing until 2 July at Mixing Room Gallery, 10 Mildura Street, Griffith. Find out more at thors.com.au.

Botticelli to Van Gogh: Masterpieces from the National Gallery

Botticelli to Van Gogh: Masterpieces from the National Gallery, London draws exclusively from one of the greatest collections of European paintings in the world.

This unprecedented exhibition includes 500 years of art in 60 paintings and comprises the largest group of works ever to travel outside of Britain in the National Gallery’s 192-year history.

Botticelli to Van Gogh features 55 of the world’s most famous and admired artists from the fifteenth to the turn of the twentieth century, including Botticelli, Titian, Rembrandt, Vermeer, El Greco, Velazquez, Goya, Turner, Constable, Van Dyck, Gainsborough, Renoir, Cézanne, Gauguin and Van Gogh.

Showing until 14 June at the National Gallery of Australia. Visit nga.gov.au/masterpieces for more information.

onetoeight

Visually arresting, humorous and thoughtful, Canberra-based artist Alison Alder reinterprets and reinvigorates portraits of the first eight prime ministers in onetoeight, a contemporary art exhibition.

Developed from Alder’s fellowship with the Australian Prime Ministers Centre and motivated by the early period of our nation’s democracy, onetoeight brings these important historical figures a little bit closer to us.

Adler’s artistic expression extends beyond the eight portraits to the intense patterned wallpaper honouring the prime minister’s wives and a Term-O-Meter animation tracking the changing political hues of individuals and governments.

Experience this immersive exhibition where Alder gives us a sense of our nation’s history that is lively, dynamic and parallels the present day.

Showing now at MOADOPH. Find out more at moadoph.gov.au.

Starstruck: On Location

Starstruck: On Location features 16 of the most striking images from the Starstruck: Australian Movie Portraits exhibition, previously seen at the National Portrait Gallery and other venues around Australia. These beautiful and poignant images tell the story of Australian cinema through the faces of our film actors—from the early 20th century through to today.

On Location features the incredible 1930s Cinesound casting books displayed as digital flip-books. They are a record of mostly unknown and keen amateurs; ‘starstruck’ hopefuls dreaming of making it big in the local industry.

Kids (and kids at heart) will love getting dressed up in iconic Australian film costumes with Magic Mirror! This interactive photobooth features costumes from Moulin Rouge! (2001), Ned Kelly (2003), The Dressmaker (2015) and Picnic at Hanging Rock (1975).

Showing now at the National Film and Sound Archive—discover more at nfsa.gov.au.

The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia

Original drawings and paintings by the artists of The Picturesque Atlas of Australasia are on show at the National Library in A Nation Imagined: The Artists of the Picturesque Atlas.

The Atlas, published in supplements between 1886 and 1889, set out to document through illustrations, maps and text a settler-colonial view of Australia’s history, landscape and ways of life. It was also a catalyst for the art movement that followed, now known as Australian impressionism.

The exhibition showcases the art of three of the Atlas’s artists: Julian Ashton, A. Henry Fullwood and Frank Mahony. The works of other Atlas contributors – including William Macleod, Ellis Rowan, Constance Roth and Americans William Smedley and Frederic B. Schell – are also featured, as well as the original engraving tools of Atlas artist George Collingridge.

Discover the exhibition at nla.gov.au.

Piinpi: Contemporary Indigenous Fashion

This stunning exhibition shines a light on Australia’s leading First Nations creatives and a design movement that is fast becoming a national fashion phenomenon.

Featuring the work of Indigenous artists and designers from the inner city to remote desert art centres, Piinpi highlights the strength and diversity of the rapidly expanding Indigenous fashion and textile industry.

Showing until 8 August at the National Museum of Australia. Visit nma.gov.au for more information.

Patricia Piccinini: Skywhales

This exhibition in the Tim Fairfax Learning Gallery presents the development of Patricia Piccinini’s hot-air balloon skywhale family  Skywhale and Skywhalepapa ­– through studio drawings, 3D models and an interview with the artist.

The skywhale family look like large friendly whales. They float in the sky rather than the sea. Skywhalepapa holds multiple babies in his claws. For the artist this reflects the changing role of male caregivers and celebrates a father’s capacity to love and support. Together, Skywhale and Skywhalepapa describe different ways of thinking about family and gender roles.

Showing at the NGA until 1 August. Find out more at knowmyname.nga.gov.au.

Crafting Canberra

Bringing together works of art and social history objects from the Canberra Museum and Gallery (CMAG) collection, Crafting Canberra explores how the Canberra community continues to evolve. This exhibition examines ways Canberra has crafted a community for itself, as well as a national identity, over time.

Showing at CMAG until 24 July.

Out of Place

Out of Place reflects on our increasingly precarious notions of place and belonging, by examining contemporary artworks that embody, transpose and reconfigure a sense of locality in a globalised world.

Through the isolation of fragments – alienated and re-materialised as objects, stains and other obscure surface impressions – artists in this exhibition trace-about the conditions that create and define distances, highlighting the powerful dissonance between site and identity, place and authority.

These strategies of dislocation serve to reveal specific relationships defined by adjacency and imbalance, recognition and oblivion.

Showing at Drill Hall Gallery until 13 June. Find out more at dhg.anu.edu.au.

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize

Art and science collide as artists investigate the natural world around them.

The Waterhouse Natural Science Art Prize commemorates the birth of the South Australian Museum’s first curator, Frederick George Waterhouse. This biennial prize provides an opportunity for artists to investigate the world around them and present their perspectives on natural science. It encourages artists to make a statement about the scientific issues facing our planet and offers a valuable platform for them to contribute to the environmental debate.

The 2020 prize winners and highly commended entrants are on show at the National Archives of Australia until 6 June 2021. The National Archives is the exclusive venue for the Prize outside South Australia.

The open winner, Grayson Cooke and Emma Walker’s video Open Air combines satellite imagery, videography and painting to produce a complex picture of a changing planet, set to The Necks’ 2013 album Open.

The emerging winner, Rebecca McEwan’s installation 4000 stories, takes the shape of a chandelier made from glass vessels filled with honey, asking us to question the value we place on honey and the existence of bees in our delicately balanced ecosystem.

Showing until 6 June at the National Archives of Australia. Visit naa.gov.au for more information.

The Trevor Kennedy Collection: Highlights

Discover objects of rare beauty and items of curiosity and wonder in this exhibition. Drawn from the rich and diverse Trevor Kennedy Collection, this selection of stunning artworks, ceramics, furniture and jewellery highlights Australia’s history, culture and identity.

Showing until 10 October at the National Museum of Australia.

Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now

Know My Name: Australian Women Artists 1900 to Now showcases art made by women. It brings together more than 300 works, drawn from the Gallery’s collection and other collections from across Australia.

This exhibition is part of a series of ongoing initiative by the National Gallery to increase the representation of artists who identify as women in its artistic program, featuring lesser-known and leading artists such as Margaret Preston, Emily Kame Kngwarreye, Destiny Deacon and Julie Rrap, this exhibition tells a new story of Australian art.

Highlights include a floor-to-ceiling presentation of artists’ portraits in a variety of mediums, the work of pioneering performance artists Bonita Ely and Jill Orr and a complete edition of Tracey Moffatt’s first major series of photographs, Something more 1989. Gemma Smith has been commissioned to paint the walls of the galleries.

By bringing together artists from different times, places and cultures, this exhibition proposes another history, upending the assumption that modern and contemporary Australian art is a male-dominated narrative.

Showing until 4 July at the National Gallery of Australia. Visit nga.gov.au for more information.

Harriet Schwarzrock: Spaces between movement and stillness

Luminous alone, the myriad tones and permutations of spaces between movement and stillness also echo the boundless forms of love in the autumn-winter exhibition, Australian Love Stories, at the National Portrait Gallery.

Harriet Schwarzrock’s new work explores notions of emotional processes and their physical manifestations. In spaces between movement and stillness, the artist has embraced science and experimentation to create visual wonders: glass, inert gases, and electricity combine into an array of organic forms, producing a captivating field of colour and movement.

The creation draws reflections on the role of the human heart as our central, exquisitely responsive ‘engine’. When we’re relaxed, the heart beats at a slow and steady rhythm; when excitement takes hold – for example, in the first throes of true love – the cadence might crank with the beat of a wilful, wild machine.

Showing until 1 August 2021 at the National Portrait Gallery.

Visit portrait.gov.au for more information.

Seeing Canberra

As a city initiated as an imagined capital for the new Australian nation, Canberra has been a place that quickly invited visual representation.

As it developed, artists have seen Canberra through different lenses, and these have shaped the way they understood and interpreted the evolving landscape.

In this exhibition, drawn primarily from CMAG’s collection, visitors will journey through four key periods of the city’s development and for each, will encounter an object that represents a prism to understand a way of seeing at that time.

Showing until 17 July at Canberra Museum and Gallery. Visit cmag.com.au for more information.

Disposed/Aerosol

Choked air begins to propagate, as an unworldly figure speaks to us through the sounds of screaming balloons. This message-in-a-virtual-bottle summons our breath to unite in a hypnotic coda. What do you believe? Is it an enchantment, elixir, ritual, or something more sinister?

Whilst we continue to breathe, more and more objects continue to be expelled and expired. Are we suffocating, or can disposed objects be reborn? How can we live in a world where we consume more than we need?

This exhibition by Michael Sollis is showing at Belconnen Arts Centre until 27 June—find out more at belcoarts.com.au.

Avalanche

This exhibition of photographic works from artist Sari Sutton is set in the ancient, dramatic Mt Kosciuszko region of the Australian Alps, exploring the unfamiliar psychological terrain of a world disrupted by pandemic and confronted by the intensifying impacts of global warming.

The rapid escalation and compression of climate and COVID-19 related events, coming to a head in 2020, for Australia and the world, are forcing a rethink of how we live in, and with, the natural environment. The images in this exhibition reflect upon the shock of disruption to our status quo—and the fragility and transience of what we often take for granted.

Showing at PhotoAccess until 5 June. Find out more at photoaccess.org.au.

Democracy. Are You In?

Democracy. Are You In? is a contemporary exhibition that aims to encourage visitors to recognise that our freedoms and our way of life are built on the foundation of democracy.

The exhibition at the Museum of Australian Democracy explores powerful stories of democracy in action through a series of photographs, objects and audiovisual displays.

Moments from Australia’s democratic journey are presented including the 1967 referendum.

Showing at MOADOPH until 31 December. Find out more at moadoph.gov.au.

Black Summer 2020: the Aftermath

This exhibition from master AIPP Photographer Ben Kopilow explores the environmental damage done by the unprecedented 2020 bushfire season in ACT/NSW. Canberra-based Kopilow focuses on the rare and haunting beauty found in the changes to the landscape wrought by the fire and the beautiful signs of hope in the way the bush is recovering.

It highlights the haunting and stark nature of the newly revealed vistas, along with the physical and environmental damage done to our native flora. It also reminds us that out of the ashes comes new growth, renewal, and even beauty. That no matter how bad things get, nature has a way of recovering, and so, in turn, does the human spirit.

Showing until 5 June at PhotoAccess Manuka—visit photoaccess.org.au for more information.

The Story of Film: An Odyssey

The Story of Film: An Odyssey is a British documentary film series about the history of cinema, presented in 15 x 1-hour chapters.

Adapted from his book, Northern Irish critic and filmmaker Mark Cousins narrates with infectious passion, selecting original film clips best seen on the big screen.

Each month, one episode is screened from the series, accompanied by some of the films he analyses.

Whether you think you know it all or want to learn more, The Story of Film: An Odyssey is a journey for everyone who loves cinema!

Showing until 15 August 2021 at the National Film and Sound Archive—see nfsa.gov.au for more.

Unbroken Connections

Unbroken Connections is the exhibition resulting from Cope’s residency at Canberra Glassworks in 2020 and 2021. During her residency, Cope worked with a variety of techniques to produce a distinct body of work that includes shield forms made from blown glass on which the artist used the ‘battuto’ technique to carve away the layers and 300 dugong bones cast from recycled television screen glass.

Cope is a Quandamooka woman from Minjerribah (North Stradbroke Island) in South East Queensland. In this exhibition, the artist explores the ongoing connection her People have had with the island for thousands of years and the unbroken connections between country, family and nature.

Showing until 18 July at canberraglassworks.com 

PlayUP

PlayUP is the Museum of Australian Democracy’s imaginative family space with activities to educate, excite and challenge young minds.

With listening pods and a roleplay Kindness Café, a fuzzy felt wall and facilitated craft activities, PlayUP has a range of exciting and immersive experiences that flip the traditional idea of museums completely on its head.

Free 2 hour sessions are facilitated everyday at 10am with additional afternoon sessions only on Tuesdays and Thursdays at 2pm. Craft topics change weekly. Bookings are essential via the MoAD website.

In Counterpoint

This exhibition brings together two friends and artists, each drawing from each other’s differences and similarities in the process of developing new work. Nino Bellantonio, an award-winning architect and emerging visual artist, and Carolyn Young, an established fine-art photographer, decided to try an experiment in collaboration in the making of artworks for this exhibition.

For their respective artworks to progress or continue, each artist needed to respond to the other’s work. Working in this form of counterpoint, Bellantonio and Young met each month (Covid allowing) for the last 18 months, each presenting their works in progress to each other for a two-person critique. The common theme that became apparent early in the process was place-inspired art, with a particular focus on novel ecosystems – the mix of native and exotic, which results from people inhabiting new places.

The results are artworks that draw upon the individual and collective process, where the work of both artists cross boundaries between collage, printmaking and photography.

Showing at Belconnen Arts Centre until 27 June—find out more at belcoarts.com.au.

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